Plans submitted for eruv in south of Greater Manchester
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Plans submitted for eruv in south of Greater Manchester

Application covers areas of Gatley and Cheadle, parts of Stockport, and would require six metre poles placed around the boundary with wire linking them

Eruv in operation
Eruv in operation

Plans have been submitted a planning application to erect an eruv on the southern edges of Greater Manchester by an Orthodox Jewish community.

An eruv is a Jewish religious boundary within which Orthodox Jews can carry out certain otherwise-restricted activities on Shabbat, such as carrying or pushing. Rabbis say it allows Orthodox members in wheelchairs to go to synagogue.

The application covers areas of Gatley and Cheadle, parts of Stockport, and requires six metre poles placed around the boundary of the eruv, with wire linking them.

The Cheadle and Gatley Eruv Committee, comprising members of Yeshurun Hebrew Congregation in Cheadle, said a “natural” eruv of walls and fences had already been identified for parts of the boundary, but poles were needed for the rest.

An eruv covering parts of north Manchester and Salford has been in place for six years, and the Stockport application is yet to be considered.

The application notes that an eruv can “understandably give rise to concern that it will lead to the concentration of a particular minority group and an imbalance in the existing social, ethnic and religious character of the area concerned”.

However, it says eruvs in fact add to social cohesion and inclusivity by helping those who need help, such as wheelchair users and parents with pushchairs.

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