New educational resource launched based on Lord Sacks’ teachings
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New educational resource launched based on Lord Sacks’ teachings

The new 10-unit curriculum will be the most far-reaching initiative by the office of the emeritus chief rabbi since he left his role

Lord Sacks speaking at Jewish News' Night of Heroes event in February 2018

Credit: Blake Ezra Photography
Lord Sacks speaking at Jewish News' Night of Heroes event in February 2018 Credit: Blake Ezra Photography

A ground breaking educational resource based on the teachings of Lord Sacks is to be launched.

The most far-reaching initiative to be launched by the office of the emeritus chief rabbi since he left the job four years ago, the 10-unit curriculum is designed for use by schools, youth groups and synagogues in the UK and around the world.

Each unit of the Ten Paths to God series focuses on a different subject from charity to faith and study to Israel, drawing on classic sources as well as the peer’s writings and speeches. “We’re very excited,” Lord Sacks said. “It’s potentially very big. Wherever we go – the States, Mexico, anywhere else – we hear the need for curriculum material on the challenging issues of Jewish identity. It’s a resource rather than a prescriptive curriculum, people can use it all or just parts.”

The spark for the project came from Lord Sacks’ communications chief Dan Sacker based on a booklet his boss had written during his chief rabbinate for the High Holy Days. It was developed with UK-born educational consultant Daniel Rose.

Several schools in the US have already expressed interest in using the new resource and talks are underway with a couple of secondary schools in Britain, before the first unit goes online this week. The remainder of the units are expected to be available in the next three months.

He said: “When people reach the end of the curriculum, we hope to do Facebook lives and skype chats to answer questions, school by school to the extent we can. If it works we’ll do further units.” It is also hoped to expand to the initial units into Russian, Hebrew and Spanish.

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