Newton manuscripts among Israel archive relics made available for Google project
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Newton manuscripts among Israel archive relics made available for Google project

Thousands of pages of hand-written manuscripts by British scientist are among amazing discoveries and inventions in the new online exhibit

Map of Jerusalem (1669 - 1699) by Romeyn de Hooghe (The National Library of Israel)
Map of Jerusalem (1669 - 1699) by Romeyn de Hooghe (The National Library of Israel)

The National Library of Israel has joined an international project run by Google to launch an enormous online exhibition of the world’s greatest discoveries and inventions.

Among the material it has made available to the internet giant are thousands of pages of hand-written manuscripts by British scientist Sir Isaac Newton, ancient maps of Jerusalem, and unique texts from Sidney Edelstein, a chemist who charted the race to master red dye.

They form part of Google Arts and Culture’s new ‘Once Upon a Try’ exhibition featuring collections, stories and knowledge from more than 110 institutions across 23 countries, highlighting humanity’s major breakthroughs and those making them.

Users can dive into an interactive world encompassing CERN’s Large Hadron Collider and experience life on-board the International Space Station, while navigating Middle Age terrains and original letters from great minds such as Albert Einstein.

Newton family geneaology. Creator: Sir Isaac Newton (National Library of Israel)

National Library of Israel director Oren Weinberg said it was imperative to use “innovative methods to open universal, digital access to historic treasures,” adding: “We are proud to share our treasures with the world.”

Amit Sood, director of Google Arts & Culture, said: “We invite everyone to participate in the first phase of an online collection that celebrates innovation and science. Through inspiring and at times surprising stories, you can explore the inventions and discoveries that have shaped our world.”

Although Newton was English, the National Library of Israel holds much of his theological work, which shows his deep interest in Jewish sources and his view regarding the role of the Jews in the process of salvation.

He took a special interest in the Scriptures and felt a deep understanding of the text would unravel the secrets of the End of Days and let him compute the date of Christ’s Second Coming and the Apocalypse, which he said would occur in 2060.

Map of Jerusalem (1669 – 1699) by Romeyn de Hooghe (The National Library of Israel)
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