Harry and Meghan meet Rabbis and students at Jewish school in Cape Town
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Harry and Meghan meet Rabbis and students at Jewish school in Cape Town

Duke and Duchess of Sussex meet representatives from different communities during South Africa visit focused on promoting interfaith relations

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex during a visit to Auwal Mosque, the oldest mosque in South Africa, on day two of their tour of Africa.   Photo credit: Tim Rooke/PA Wire
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex during a visit to Auwal Mosque, the oldest mosque in South Africa, on day two of their tour of Africa. Photo credit: Tim Rooke/PA Wire

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex met with rabbis and heard about students’ experience attending a Jewish school, during his visit to Cape Town in South Africa.

Prince Harry and his wife Meghan visited the city’s oldest mosque during a trip focused on promoting interfaith dialogue and religious tolerance.

The Royal couple met with representatives of the Church of England and Rabbis, together with Christian, Jewish and Muslim youth leaders, including students who are participating in the Cape Town Interfaith Initiative.

The programme works with 15- to 18-year-olds to help develop respect for people from different religions, faiths cultures and backgrounds and an appreciation of the value of diversity.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex during a visit to Auwal Mosque, the oldest mosque in South Africa, on day two of their tour of Africa. Photo credit should read: Tim Rooke/PA Wire

Among them was Peter Oki, 18, an Anglican Christian, originally from Lagos, Nigeria, who moved to Cape Town five years ago and attended a Jewish school.

Sitting cross-legged on the floor of the mosque with a group of students, having removed their shoes, the couple heard how Peter was the only black student at his school.

“It was rather difficult to begin with,” he said. “I was often asked by other students what I was doing at a Jewish school, but I have taken programmes and organised activities to try and deconstruct the barriers and obliterate stereotypes among young people.

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