Farage’s Brexit Party dismisses concerns over Soros rhetoric as ‘pathetic’
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Farage’s Brexit Party dismisses concerns over Soros rhetoric as ‘pathetic’

Farage said the EU was funded by the Hungarian-US philanthropist and the work of his foundation could amount to “the biggest level of political collusion in history”

Nigel Farage  (Wikipedia/Gage Skidmore )
Nigel Farage (Wikipedia/Gage Skidmore )

Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage has dismissed Jewish community concerns about his use of language in relation to Jewish financier and philanthropist George Soros.

His reaction comes after the latest revelations concerning comments on far-right TV shows in the United States, in which he described Soros as the “biggest danger to western world”.

Soros, 88, was born in Hungary and made his money investing. He has put billions of dollars into his Open Society Foundations, which funds liberal causes around the world, challenging authoritarianism in central and eastern Europe.

Several right-wing governments, most notably in Hungary, have responded by attacking Soros using antisemitic imagery, to such an extent that he is now a favourite hate figure among far-right antisemites.

Among the accusations levelled against Soros, Farage said the philanthropist wanted to fundamentally reshape Europe’s racial makeup and to end the continent’s Christian culture.

Farage also said the European Union was funded and influenced Soros and that the work of his foundation could amount to “the biggest level of political collusion in history”.

This week the Community Security Trust (CST) said Farage should “ensure that his language does not help these ideas to spread in British politics,” but his newly-formed Brexit Party described condemnation of him as “pathetic”.

Last week, the former UKIP leader and LBC Radio host faced the wrath of the Board of Deputies and the CST after hearing more of his past comments to Alex Jones, an American conspiracy theorist who hosts the Infowars show.

Farage was found to have discussed “globalists” seeking to engineer “a new world order,” ideas that Jewish security experts say are linked to the antisemitism.

“For Jones’s conspiracy-minded audience, Farage’s references to ‘globalists’ and ‘new world order’ will be taken as familiar code-words for antisemitic conspiracy theories,” said the CST.

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