Duchess of Cambridge officially opens new Holocaust exhibit at Imperial War Museum
search

The latest Jewish News

Read this week’s digital edition

Click Here

Duchess of Cambridge officially opens new Holocaust exhibit at Imperial War Museum

Kate saw the Generations: Portraits Of Holocaust Survivors exhibition which includes two photographic portraits she took last year to mark 75 years since the end of the Shoah.

Justin Cohen is the News Editor at the Jewish News

The Duchess of Cambridge during a visit the Imperial War Museum (IWM) in London to officially open two new galleries, the Second World War Gallery and the Holocaust Gallery.
The Duchess of Cambridge during a visit the Imperial War Museum (IWM) in London to officially open two new galleries, the Second World War Gallery and the Holocaust Gallery.

The Duchess of Cambridge has been reunited with Holocaust survivors Yvonne Bernstein and Steven Frank at an exhibition of photographs of survivors and refugees – including two she took of the pair as part of a Jewish News project.

The future Queen chatted with the survivors at the Imperial War Museum, nearly two years after she photographed them to kick off an initiative to mark the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.

Since then, a dozen leading photographers around the country have captured images of some of Britain’s last survivors, often alongside their children and grandchildren, for the exhibit.

The exhibition – designed to celebrate those who built new lives in the UK – was brought to life by a partnership between this newspaper, The Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, Royal Photographic Society, Dangoor Education and IWM, where it will remain until January when it will go on a national tour.

Holocaust survivor Steven Frank with the portrait by the Duchess of Cambridge (© Derryn Vranch / Royal Photographic Society)

Among those Kate met was Yvonne and Steven, who she had previously described as two of the most “life-affirming people she’s ever met”. While Covid precautions meant she kept a one metre distance from most, she couldn’t help but hug a thrilled Steven. The 86-year-old survivor of several camps, who was photographed with his granddaughters Maggie and Trixie by the Duchess in the style of Vermeer, told Jewish News: “I’ve never been hugged by a future Queen before. She was so warm and, like two years ago, wanted to hear my story.”

The Duchess’ portrait featured on the JN front page

Trixie, 15, added: “My grandpa tells his story in local schools but the Duchess being here means more people will know what happened. She was so cool.”

For a beaming Yvonne, who had been a hidden child in France and was accompanied by granddaughter Chloe, the reunion was the very first time she’d been out beside for basic food shopping since the start of the pandemic. She too received a kiss and a hug – before joking that the pandemic must have deprived her of the second royal kiss she received two years ago.

Olivia Marks-Woldman, CEO of the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, said: “To come together across the generations to celebrate this wonderful project felt so special, particularly knowing the Maggie, Trixie and Chloe will be witnesses long after we’ve no longer here.”

The Duchess of Cambridge arrives at the Imperial War Museum (IWM) in London to officially open two new galleries, the Second World War Gallery and The Holocaust Gallery.

They were introduced to Kate alongside Jewish News’ Justin Cohen, who conceived the project, and Michael Dangoor, of exhibition sponsors Dangoor Education. He said: “It’s so wonderful how the Duchess is so hands on. She’s a credit to the Royal Family.”

She was guided by IWM director Diane Lees. Officially opening the landmark Second World War and Holocaust Galleries, she was shown exhibits including a V1 rocket and a box from the secret Oneg Shabbat archive of the Warsaw Ghetto.

Saying she was honoured to host HRH, Lees said: “Formally opening these Galleries, which are dedicated to improving understanding of two of the most devastating conflicts and genocides in human history, a day before the world stands together to remember those who have fallen in war, is incredibly poignant for us. Given that this period will sadly soon pass out of living memory, we want these Galleries to preserve the stories of our veterans, our eyewitnesses and our survivors, and ensure that we never forget what they experienced.”

The Duchess of Cambridge (right) walks with Imperial War Museum Director Diane Lees as she leaves following a visit to the museum in London to officially open two new galleries, the Second World War Gallery and the Holocaust Gallery.

 

Support your Jewish community. Support your Jewish News

Thank you for helping to make Jewish News the leading source of news and opinion for the UK Jewish community. Today we're asking for your invaluable help to continue putting our community first in everything we do.

Unlike other Jewish media, we do not charge for content. That won’t change. Because we are free, we rely on advertising to cover our costs. This vital lifeline, which has dropped in recent years, has fallen further due to coronavirus.

For as little as £5 a month you can help sustain the vital work we do in celebrating and standing up for Jewish life in Britain.

Jewish News holds our community together and keeps us connected. Like a synagogue, it’s where people turn to feel part of something bigger. It also proudly shows the rest of Britain the vibrancy and rich culture of modern Jewish life.

You can make a quick and easy one-off or monthly contribution of £5, £10, £20 or any other sum you’re comfortable with.

100% of your donation will help us continue celebrating our community, in all its dynamic diversity...

Engaging

Being a community platform means so much more than producing a newspaper and website. One of our proudest roles is media partnering with our invaluable charities to amplify the outstanding work they do to help us all.

Celebrating

There’s no shortage of oys in the world but Jewish News takes every opportunity to celebrate the joys too, through projects like Night of Heroes, 40 Under 40 and other compelling countdowns that make the community kvell with pride.

Pioneering

In the first collaboration between media outlets from different faiths, Jewish News worked with British Muslim TV and Church Times to produce a list of young activists leading the way on interfaith understanding.

Campaigning

Royal Mail issued a stamp honouring Holocaust hero Sir Nicholas Winton after a Jewish News campaign attracted more than 100,000 backers. Jewish Newsalso produces special editions of the paper highlighting pressing issues including mental health and Holocaust remembrance.

Easy access

In an age when news is readily accessible, Jewish News provides high-quality content free online and offline, removing any financial barriers to connecting people.

Voice of our community to wider society

The Jewish News team regularly appears on TV, radio and on the pages of the national press to comment on stories about the Jewish community. Easy access to the paper on the streets of London also means Jewish News provides an invaluable window into the community for the country at large.

We hope you agree all this is worth preserving.

read more:
comments