Dress worn by Amy Winehouse for final stage performance fetches £180,000
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Dress worn by Amy Winehouse for final stage performance fetches £180,000

Minidress designed by stylist Naomi Parry and worn during Winehouse’s final stage performance sold for £180,000, 16 times the original estimate.

Dress designed by Naomi Parry, which Amy Winehouse wore for her final stage performance in Belgrade in June 2011 which has sold for more than 243,000 US dollars (£180,000) at an auction of the late singer's estate. And Amy Winehouse
Dress designed by Naomi Parry, which Amy Winehouse wore for her final stage performance in Belgrade in June 2011 which has sold for more than 243,000 US dollars (£180,000) at an auction of the late singer's estate. And Amy Winehouse

The dress worn by Amy Winehouse during her final stage performance has sold for more than 243,000 dollars (£180,000) at an auction of the late singer’s estate.

The Julien’s Auctions sale raised more than 4 million dollars (£3 million) from over 800 items including clothing, handwritten notes and accessories that became staples of her image.

Many of the headline items attracted bids shattering their pre-auction estimates.

A figure-hugging halter minidress designed by stylist Naomi Parry and worn during Winehouse’s final stage performance sold for £180,000, 16 times the original estimate.

The singer appeared in the bamboo and floral print dress in Belgrade in June 2011, a month before her death at 27.

The bold red leather heart-shaped Moschino bag Winehouse took to the 2007 Brit Awards – a night she won the British female solo artist award – fetched 204,800 dollars (£152,000), 13 times the pre-auction estimate.

A gold flame Dolce & Gabbana stage-worn dress went for 150,000 dollars (£111,000), 30 times its guide price.

A Temperley London tan and black jumpsuit worn for her performance celebrating Nelson Mandela’s 90th birthday yielded more than 121,000 dollars (£90,000). Its estimate was 1,000 dollars.

The Christian Louboutin tan peep toe heels worn at the same performance went under the hammer for 38,400 dollars (£28,000) – 64 times the estimate.

Dress designed by Naomi Parry, which Amy Winehouse wore for her final stage performance in Belgrade in June 2011 which has sold for more than 243,000 US dollars (£180,000) at an auction of the late singer’s estate.

Elsewhere, a Vivienne Tam plaid dress worn to an awards show in Dublin in 2007 went for 93,750 dollars (£70,000), a minidress from the same designer and worn on stage fetched 83,200 dollars (62,000) and an Agent Provocateur bra and red bow worn in the You Know I’m No Good music video sold for 25,600 dollars (£19,000).

Pairs of her petal pink ballet slippers sold for between 12,500-19,200 dollars (£9,000-£14,000).

And a metal street sign reading “Camden Square” inscribed with handwritten notes paying tribute to Winehouse after her death sold for 19,200 dollars (£14,000).

All proceeds from Julien’s Auctions’s Life and Career of Amy Winehouse auction are going towards the foundation Winehouse’s parents set up in her memory which helps young people suffering with addiction.

Grammy-winner Winehouse was one of the defining stars of her generation, known for her soulful voice on songs including Rehab, Back To Black and Love Is A Losing Game.

She died in July 2011 from alcohol poisoning after a high-profile struggle with addiction.

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