Cards at Yad Vashem helps to mark holiday season 
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Cards at Yad Vashem helps to mark holiday season 

Museum's rich collection of testimony, artefacts and prayer books offer a glimpse into how Jews lived before, during and after the Holocaust

Jenni Frazer is a freelance journalist

A Rosh Hashanah card sent by Aharon and Sheindl Blumen in 1926 from Luboml, Poland
A Rosh Hashanah card sent by Aharon and Sheindl Blumen in 1926 from Luboml, Poland

 The High Holy Days are traditionally a time for introspection, asking for and giving forgiveness, resolving to do better, and praying for a healthy and happy year to come.

Yad Vashem’s rich collection of testimony, artefacts, photos, cards and prayer books offer a glimpse into some of the ways that Jews before, during and immediately after the Holocaust marked these special days.

www.yadvashem.org/yv/en/exhibitions/rosh_hashana/index.asp

A group of men practicing the custom of tashlich (casting off). The custom involves going to a river or creek on Rosh Hashanah and casting a piece of bread into it, symbolising the “casting off” of sins:

A group of men practicing the custom of tashlich (casting off). The custom involves going to a river or creek on Rosh Hashanah and casting a piece of bread into it, symbolising the “casting off” of sins:

Jews on their way to services on Yom Kippur. The Hebrew greeting on top reads: “May you be inscribed for a good year”

Jews on their way to services on Yom Kippur. The Hebrew greeting on top reads: “May you be inscribed for a good year”

A Rosh Hashanah card sent by Aharon and Sheindl Blumen in 1926 from Luboml, Poland

A Rosh Hashanah card sent by Aharon and Sheindl Blumen in 1926 from Luboml, Poland

“Shana Tova” (Happy New Year) card sent to Henia Pollock in Argentina, from her relatives in Końskie, Poland, 1939

“Shana Tova” (Happy New Year) card sent to Henia Pollock in Argentina, from her relatives in Końskie, Poland, 1939

 

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