Bristol University adopts full IHRA definition after calls from Jewish students
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Bristol University adopts full IHRA definition after calls from Jewish students

Jewish groups praised the move, calling it an 'important first step' toward protecting students

Students calling on the University of Bristol to adopt IHRA definition at protest outside Wills Hall Conference Centre (Credit: Union of Jewish Students / Twitter)
Students calling on the University of Bristol to adopt IHRA definition at protest outside Wills Hall Conference Centre (Credit: Union of Jewish Students / Twitter)

Jewish groups hailed the University of Bristol’s full adoption of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition of antisemitism (IHRA) as an “important first step” towards protecting students.

The decision was announced on Monday after growing pressure on the university to adopt in full the definition of anti-Jewish racism and all its accompanying examples.

It comes after Jewish students staged a protest last month outside a university trustee meeting where the decision was to be debated.

Jewish groups welcomed the move – a sign both the Bristol J-Soc and Union of Jewish Students said demonstrated the university had “listened to their Jewish students.”

“The University of Bristol has not been free of antisemitic incidents, and the adoption of this definition is an important first step in helping the university tackle anti-Jewish racism,” read a statement from the J-Soc and Union of Jewish Students.

Board of Deputies vice president Amanda Bowman described the move as “an important first step towards protecting Jewish students, academics and staff.”

“The definition, with its examples, is a useful yardstick to determine whether specific actions are or are not antisemitic,” she added.

A spokesperson for the university said: “We take this opportunity to restate that there is no place for any racism, bullying or discrimination at the University of Bristol and that this should be a place where all feel safe, welcomed and respected, of gender, gender identity, religion, race, sexual orientation, disability, age or social background.”

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