A neo-Nazi group opposed to the “Jewification” of London has arranged is a demonstration in Stamford Hill for 22 March.

Joshua Bonehill, described as a “nationalist, socialist and fascist,” posted a video online calling on “fellow countrymen, fellow whites” to join the “peaceful” demonstration in a “dignified and honourable manner”.

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One of the posters advertising the 22 March demonstration

He said the march was against neighbourhood watch group Shomrim, which he called “foreign and unlawful” and which he said “enforces Talmudic law on the streets.”

He added: “They police drive similar cars to the real police, wear similar uniforms to our police and yet have not been arrested for impersonating the police!”

Some were quick to point out the irony, given that in 2011 Bonehill was charged with breaking into a police station and trying to steal a police uniform.

Others were more concerned by the anti-Semitic nature of the march, given that Bonehill described Stamford Hill as a “prime example of Jewification” – a process whereby “Jewish culture occupies white nations, rendering them unrecognisable”.

He defended the march, saying: “We are not going there to incite hate or attack the community,” but called on marchers to be “defiant in the face of opposition from the Jewish community shielded by their anti-white, anti-fascist thugs”. He added: “We will not be threatened by the anti-whites or their Jewish puppet masters.”

Late last week, in an online blog, he said: “White people are openly spat at and viewed simply as Goyim, slave to the Jew. Shomrim place signs asking women to walk on the opposite side of the road to men, Jewish paedophiles and grooming gangs go unreported to the police as the Shomrim police cover up for them.”

And in a chilling echo of the 1930s, he said: “I can’t just sit here and do nothing whilst White people are being driven out of their homes by this Jewish menace.”

The march has been scheduled for 14:00 on Sunday 22 March at Clapton Common, in the heart of Europe’s largest community of Orthodox Jews.

A Police spokesman said: “We are aware of this application and a decision on whether to allow this demonstration has yet to be made. We are in consultation with the community about the possible impact of the event.” 

When asked what other factors would be considered, he added: “It’s a question of whether it can be policed.”