A six-year-old Syrian girl has finally left an Israeli hospital after seven months’ treatment for a haematological (blood) disease, as carers and medics threw her a farewell party.

The youngster, known only as ‘B,’ was presented with a backpack containing everything she needs for primary school, after her stint at Rambam Healthcare Campus in Haifa.

‘B’ arrived in early February from the chaos of Syria’s civil war, and left this week, as staff comprising Jews, Muslims, Christians and Druze applauded her recovery from the blood disorder medics discovered while treating her initial injuries.

“For Israeli children with this disease, the treatment is straightforward and generally yields good results,” said a hospital spokesman. “A bone marrow donor is found, the child is isolated from infection, the bone marrow transplant is performed and, if all goes well, the child recovers. For a Syrian child, however, it is much more complex.”

The team, led by Dr. Irena Zeidman and Dr. Ayelet Ben-Barak, tracked B’s relatives in Syria and brought back blood samples from them, to see if there were any potential donors. Thankfully, her brother’s sample matched.

Medics at the Israeli hospital threw a party for the six-year-old Syrian girl after her successful seven-month stay.

Medics at the Israeli hospital threw a party for the six-year-old Syrian girl after her successful seven-month stay.

“I’ll never forget when they first brought in those test tubes, discreetly wrapped in dish towels,” said Nurse Iris Porat, recalling the two-week donation process, and the marathon recovery period, during which time B even dressed up in Purim costume.

As she left this week, B’s mother said: “I would lie if I said that I expected the kind of humanity I discovered here. I am grateful for your care and sensitivity; may God protect you. And we will always remember what you did for us.”