Letters

Board manifesto regurgitates junk

Dear Sir

Reading the Board of Deputies’ “Ten Commitments” regarding the upcoming general election [Jewish News, 25 March] made me wonder from which extremity of the left-wing political spectrum the Board hails.

I presume it’s considered politically correct to reiterate “climate change and human rights abuses” – although the former might be rather presumptuous since our Maker determines the climate in spite of human endeavours and the latter would be better aimed at the UN Human Rights Council, whose only concern is to condemn Israel.

What’s more of concern to me is this: ”Advocate for a permanent comprehensive solution to the Israeli (sic)-Palestinian conflict resulting in a secure Israel alongside a viable Palestinian state”.

This sounds fine but in essence it’s rubbish.

Have they not observed what happens in the Middle East? The current wars in Syria, Iraq, Libya, Yemen; the fate of minorities in Iraq, Syria, Egypt; the decimation of the Christian community throughout the Middle East; and what happened following Israel vacating Gaza in 2005 in the name of peace.

Finally, the inability of Muslims to live peacefully with any other group throughout the world; as Netanyahu once said, the only peace they want is peace – without Israel, which is precisely what the “peace process” aims to achieve.

For a body claiming to represent British Jewry, I would have hoped it could have done better than regurgitate this junk.

Rabbi Menahem Lester

London & Israel

My poll: Some 60% would vote UKIP

Dear Sir

It was a pleasure to talk to around 80 sixth form students from Hasmonean Boys’ School who attended their Q&A style hustings on 26 March.

They were well engaged with the political process and raised some excellent questions to the Finchley and Golders Green candidates from UKIP (myself), Labour, Lib-Dems and The Green Party. Mike Freer [Conservative] had requested a separate “me only” event at the school the week before, raising a few eyebrows.

There was a focus on Jewish issues and questions went on for more than an hour. At the end, more than 60 percent of the boys came and shook my hand and said they would be voting UKIP. The other panel members were really quite shocked.

The young students were mature and open-minded and could see right through the waffle and fence-sitting of the Lib-Lab-Greens on Jewish issues. Let’s hope they take the message home to their parents. I hope you might be able join me at one of the other hustings coming up soon to hear UKIP’s “real” policies rather the usual lies you will have heard from our opponents.

A full review of the event can be found on www.UkipBarnet.org with our policies particularly relating to UKIP and the Jewish Community. With this level of support Vote UKIP and Get UKIP!

Richard King

UKIP candidate for Finchley and Golders Green

Media should take a French lesson

Dear Sir

In the current climate of anti-Semitic attacks and anti-Israel reporting on UK news channels and some newspapers, it is refreshing to note one English-speaking news channel, France 24, is not one-sided against Israel in its reporting.

The coverage during the recent Israeli elections was excellent; it contained up-to-date exit polls and debates.

All the latest information about Israel is reported on a daily basis. It’s certainly worth giving France 24 it a try.

Alan Garfield

Northwood

Not the Israel I know and love

 

Dear Sir

It’s not often I feel depressed after reading Jewish News, but the articles by Stephen Oryszczuk and Asher Susser about the challenges faced by Israel managed to do just that [Jewish News, 26 March]. These pieces seemed so without hope. This is not the Israel I know and love.

On my last visit, albeit on holiday, I felt the wonderful atmosphere whereever I went. Yes, bad things happen, as we know, but I felt safe and proud to be in the Jewish homeland. Some of our faith who wish to distance themselves from Israel have clearly still not learned the lessons of 80 years ago.

Israel is not perfect. But the country is all we have.

Sidney Sands

N12

Campus tension in Edinburgh

Dear Sir

As a former Edinburgh University student, it’s very sad to read how Jewish students there are being made to feel uncomfortable.

Back in 2000, I studied part of my degree in the Islamic and Middle Eastern studies department. There was a very left-wing ethos and the library had been funded by the Saudi royal family. Nevertheless, the lecturers and students were open to all voices.

When representatives of the Israeli Embassy were invited on campus by the JSoc, it was advertised in lectures and all kinds of people attended.

Nobody tried to boycott or stop the guest speaking, although people asked tough questions and they were discussed openly in an intellectual manner.

What a shame that because there is now less hope and tolerance in the Middle East than there was 15 years ago, that it is reflected on campus.

The BME group should be prioritising the interests and inclusion of Jewish students, a very small minority group in Edinburgh, over people in another country.

The motion will exclude Jewish students from university life and whether it will help Palestinians is debatable. I would argue it does not.

Daniel Needlestone

jewishnews.co.uk

Supplement was shock reminder

Dear Sir

I write with sadness after reading the recent Community Security Trust supplement in your newspaper [Jewish News, 2 April].

How can anti-Semitic placards be carried by Palestinian demonstrators on our streets, one praising Adolf Hitler for the slaughter and torture inflicted upon our brethren numbering millions?

Seven decades later, why do we tolerate such agitation?

On a happier note, it was good to read about the support we all receive from the CST to combat such racism.

Stanley Fox

AJEX Wembley

As if a Lavoyah isn’t sad enough

Dear Sir

I would suggest your readers do not do as my wife and I just did; attend a Lavoyah during Pesach. We went back to the house afterwards and there wasn’t a single bagel.

Jeff Best

Southgate