A swastika daubed on a house in Hendon recently.

A swastika daubed on a house in Hendon recently.

A parliamentary report will be produced into lessons that can be learned from the upsurge of anti-Semitic incidents during the Middle East crisis. 

Attacks on rabbis and synagogues and daubings at Jewish-owned properties are among the incidents have contributed to a doubling of incidents across the UK, with more than 100 cases reported to the Community Security Trust.

Concern has also been expressed over some of the banners displayed at pro-Palestinian rallies. 

While the focus of the report will predominantly be on the UK, lessons and evidence will be drawn from European countries.In France and Germany, synagogues have also been attacked, Jewish-owned businesses torched and marchers have chanted ‘Jews to the gas chambers’.

The process, has today announced plans to instigate will commence in September and report back later in the autumn, chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism, John Mann, announced.

The MP said: “It is to our collective shame that antisemitic incidents have been proliferating throughout the UK and Europe in recent weeks. We must learn some lessons to ensure that Middle East tensions do not play out on the streets at home.”

A Shomrim volunteer removing a swastika painted on a wall in Lower Clapton over the weekend.

A Shomrim volunteer removing a swastika painted on a wall in Lower Clapton over the weekend.

Reacting to the current upsurge, Crime Prevention Minister Norman Baker said: “All forms of hate crime, including anti-Semitism, are deplorable. The government takes this issue very seriously and we have robust legislation in place to protect people from hatred, hostility and violence. 

“Prevention is one of the key objectives of our hate crime action plan – and we are working closely with leading Jewish community organisations and other partners to reduce the risk of incidents.

“Anyone who is a victim of hate crime should report the incident to the police.”