A proposed code of conduct presented by Jeremy Corbyn to Labour’s ruling body has been described as a “reasonable starting point”.

But the Jewish Labour Movement said it failed to address the specific issues raised in recent weeks, amid a string of revelations about comments made by party members about Jews, Zionists and Israel.

A code of conduct was presented to the national executive committee by the party leader last week as part of a package of measures he’d announced at the height of the anti-Semitism scandal, but was only published today. Saying Labour won’t tolerate racism “in any form” inside or outside Labour, the text says: “The Party welcomes all who share or aims and values, and encourages political debate and campaigns around the vital issues, policies and injustices of our time.

“Any behaviour or use of language which targets or intimidates members of ethnic or religious communities, or incites racism, including anti-Semitism and Islamophobia, or undermines Labour’s ability to campaign against any form of racism, is unacceptable conduct within the Labour Party.”

Shami Chakrabarti, who is leading Labour’s inquiry on anti-Semitism in the party, raised the possibility of altering the proposed code of conduct within the remit of her work.

Jeremy Newmark, chair of the Jewish Labour Movement, said: “It’s a reasonable starting point but stops short of addressing the specific themes and motifs that have become prevalent in recent weeks and months. We hope that once it has been reviewed by the Chakrabarti inquiry it will be toughened up and, combined with rule changes, will become a key part of the party’s tool kit in fighting anti-Semitism.”