When Jewish primary school student Conrad Robinson wrote to the Queen with a message of peace and love, he probably didn’t expect a letter back.

But for this youngster from Clore Shalom School in Shenley, Hertfordshire, that’s exactly what happened.

As part of a school initiative, Mrs Kelly’s Jewish Studies class sought ways in which they could respond to the difficulties of the summer, so boys and girls got down to creating a Hamsa, a religious symbol of significance to Jews, Muslims and Christians.

They then sent their ‘Hands of Peace’ cards to local schools, places of worship and charities. One child sent theirs to Great Ormond Street Hospital “because children who are sick, might like a card to cheer them up,” while Conrad decided the Queen needed to hear what he had to say.

Clore Shalom 8th Oct 2014(MM)9440

Hear it she did, said her Lady in Waiting Jennifer Gordon Lennox, who sent a personalised reply explaining how Her Majesty was thrilled with his message of peace for the Jewish New Year. 

“I was happy, shocked and surprised,” he said.

“I felt a bit special that the Queen wrote to me. I sent it to the Queen because I think the whole country would be more peaceful if we shared our land, food and  resources better; I hoped she’d be able to help.”

Teacher Melanie Kelly said she hoped the initiative would create a ripple effect, with the message spreading.

“We are hoping that in addition to receiving a Hand of Peace Hamsa Card from us, they will also send their card on to someone else that they would like to send a message of peace,” she said.

“This way our web can continue to grow. It’s a wonderful opportunity to teach children about how powerful and influential they can be.”