Jewish charities have voiced concerns about how the uncertainty associated with Brexit may impact upon their work.

Following Britain’s decision to leave the European Union last week, Jewish fundraising organisations have spoken about its possible affect on staff recruitment and delivering services.

Simon Morris, chief executive of Jewish Care commented that it was an “uncertain time” for them.

He said: “We have a significant number of staff working across the organisation who are EU nationals”, adding that they “have major concerns about the impact of Brexit on us and the wider health and social care sectors ability to fill vacancies”.

Morris added that they were “talking to our advisors and doing all we can to reassure staff we will support them as best we can.”

Norwood’s chief executive, Elaine Kerr said “at this point we are unable to predict the impact, if any, of leaving the EU on our work.”

She said “we will not suffer a detrimental impact”, as long as “the UK economy is healthy and local authorities and the NHS can continue to fund care and support for our services users at current levels, and our donors own financial positions are maintained.”

World Jewish Releif, who work mainly in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, said they were primarily concerned over the value of sterling.

A spokesperson said they received no funding from the EU, because most vulnerable Jews they support are outside of the union – in Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and Ukraine .

However, they said that the devaluing of the pound since last week will hit them hardest. “We commit money to partners in sterling; currency depreciation means that for every pound we commit to our partners, it will now be worth less in the local currency.”

“Whatever happens, we will do everything to ensure that our vital programmes continue to provide a lifeline to those in need around the world.”