Among the mix of  Moses toys and kids’ cookery, rabbis, shopkeepers, designers, and even wine makers  reflect on Passovers of their youth.

But it is wit  these personalised seder plates representing their schools that children make the greatest contribution.

Created by pupils at Etz Chaim, Mathilda Marks Kennedy, Rosh Pinah and Wolfson Hillel, the work speaks for itself.

We thank them for their efforts and wish them a happy Passover!

Etz Chaim

 

The Year 5 pupils at Etz Chaim were asked to create ‘unique’ seder plates as part of their home learning. “Why ‘unique’?” wrote their teacher Ivana Levy. “Because the seder plate represents you and YOU are unique.” Year 5 also worked in groups to make a seder plate for the school, which features on our front page.

Rosh Pinah

“You put the karpas  in, the karpas out. In out, in out and shake it all about,” wrote Lin Carr on one of the many colourful plates produced by Rosh Pinah pupils. On one, plate bitter herbs were represented as illness – “which stops you from playing with your friends at school”.

Wolfson Hillel

Sharing, team work and care for the community were dominant themes on the plates created by  Years 5 and 6 at Wolfson Hillel, where students used a combination of  photography and drawings to convey the school’s philosophy.

Mathilda Marks-Kennedy

“The school is a happy place” seemed to be the general consensus among the pupils at Mathilda Marks-Kennedy where, according to India (plate below), “We have rules and they are wonderful and nice.” Reuben sums it up most efficiently with his five stars, claiming: “I rate this school.”