A tour guide who prevented further tragedy by shooting dead a Palestinian terrorist after he rammed his truck into a group of Israeli soldiers in Jerusalem has spoken for the first time about his heroism.
Eytan Rund was sent flying when the truck drove into the group as they disembarked in Jerusalem’s Old Town, killing four. While injured, he approached the cabin and shot the driver as he sought to reverse over the group lying injured.
Rund, an army reservist, initially criticised the response of Israeli soldiers for not immediately shooting the driver, saying: “It’s not easy for me to say, but there could have been a lot fewer wounded.” He later clarified his remarks, after IDF bosses contradicted him, saying soldiers did in fact shoot the assailant.
The scene where a truck rammed in a group of Israeli soldiers.

The scene where a truck rammed in a group of Israeli soldiers.

In a video, he said: “I shot my entire clip at him. Together with me there were a few other brave soldiers shooting. To tell you the truth I really don’t feel very brave, I did what everyone else would have done. I just feel grateful that I am alive and well and can read my kids a bedtime story, rather than have them attend my funeral. If I had been standing 10 inches in another direction I wouldn’t be here today. I appreciate all those who have sent me kind messages.”

British Friends of Emunah director Deborah Nathan this week said Rund had been the guide for her 18-year-old daughter Eliana on trips organised by the Midreshet Torat Chesed Seminary (MTC) which is based in the Emunah Bet Elazraki Children’s Home in Netanya.
“Eytan has guided many British gap year programmes,” she said. “He is an absolutely lovely guy, more usually found playing guitar and singing to the students he is guiding.”
The charity’s supporters were joined in sadness this week, however, with news that Israel Emunah employees Keren Orbach and Iris Zangy, who lost their son and nephew Erez in the attack.
Eytan Rund was sent flying when the truck drove into the group as they disembarked in Jerusalem’s Old Town, killing four. While injured, he approached the cabin and shot the driver as he sought to reverse over the group lying injured.
Rund, an army reservist, initially criticised the response of Israeli soldiers for not immediately shooting the driver, saying: “It’s not easy for me to say, but there could have been a lot fewer wounded.” He later clarified his remarks, after IDF bosses contradicted him, saying soldiers did in fact shoot the assailant.
In a video, he said: “I shot my entire clip at him. Together with me there were a few other brave soldiers shooting. To tell you the truth I really don’t feel very brave, I did what everyone else would have done. I just feel grateful that I am alive and well and can read my kids a bedtime story, rather than have them attend my funeral. If I had been standing 10 inches in another direction I wouldn’t be here today. I appreciate all those who have sent me kind messages.”
British Friends of Emunah director Deborah Nathan this week said Rund had been the guide for her 18-year-old daughter Eliana on trips organised by the Midreshet Torat Chesed Seminary (MTC) which is based in the Emunah Bet Elazraki Children’s Home in Netanya.
“Eytan has guided many British gap year programmes,” she said. “He is an absolutely lovely guy, more usually found playing guitar and singing to the students he is guiding.”
The charity’s supporters were joined in sadness this week, however, with news that Israel Emunah employees Keren Orbach and Iris Zangy, who lost their son and nephew Erez in the attack.