CST’s security Enhancement Project funds the installation and improvement of security equipment at over 600 Jewish communal buildings around the UK, to protect against terrorist attacks.

CST provides grants of between 50% and 90% of the cost of this equipment to Jewish communal buildings, funded by charitable donations to CST.

In every instance, the security enhancement is designed to deter and detect hostile activity, and to minimise casualties and damage in case of attack. State of the art CCTV systems, entry and exit controls, fencing and other equipment may be provided.

Analysis shows that flying glass is often a major cause of death and injury in a terrorist attack. As one detailed example of CST’s numerous security provisions, these are some of the measures we may take against the danger of flying glass:

Anti-Shatter Film: A polyester film, with pressure-sensitive adhesive properties that is applied to the inside of the window to prevent the glass breaking up into lethal shards.

CablingSteel cables installed across the inside of the window, to combine with anti-shatter film as a “catch system”: preventing the pane of glass being blown out of its frame.

AnchoringStrengthens the connection between the window pane and the frame to reduce the risk of glass blowing out from its frame.

Bomb Blast Net Curtains: Used in conjunction with anti-shatter film to serve as a “catch system” to further prevent the danger of flying glass.

Liquid Film: Used on ribbed or frosted glass panes where anti-shatter film cannot be applied on a non-smooth surface.

Secondary Glazing: Where anti-shatter or liquid film cannot be applied, such as on stained glass windows, a secondary glazing barrier of laminated glass is fitted inside the existing external glazing.

Distance Creation: Use of physical measures such as anti-ram bollards and gates in conjunction with strong perimeter fencing to keep the threat away and at a secure distance.