Axed Celebrity Big Bro luvvie Christopher Biggins faced more humiliation after TV footage emerged of him goosestepping in Nazi uniform giving a “Sieg Heil” salute.

Biggins was removed from the house following three warnings from Big Brother for his remarks on bisexuality and for a comment about gas chambers made to X Factor reject Katie Waissel, who is Jewish.

As housemates queued for the bathroom, he said: “You better be careful or they’ll be putting you in a shower and taking you to a room.”

He later apologised to the singer and Big Brother for the “trite, ridiculous remark”, which was not broadcast but which he discussed in an interview.

Following his eviction, Biggins told Jewish News: “I am mortified by what I said. It was a stupid thing to do and I truly regret it. I apologised to Katie straight away and we cleared the air, but I’d also like to apologise to the wider Jewish community.”

Admitting that the remark was about the Nazis and gas chambers, he said: “I suppose I was, yes. But it didn’t occur to me that’s what I was referring to.”

Biggins said he had said sorry to Katie in person after being given a warning by Big Brother, and was sorry for his “trite, ridiculous remark”.

Showbiz agent Jonathan Shalit, who represents Biggins, told Jewish News: “I have been close friends and worked with Biggins for many years and can confirm that he would never intentionally cause offence. If something was said in jest which caused offence then I am certain that was not his intention. Biggins is a much loved and wonderful man.”

But in an interview in The Sun on Sunday, he stood by his comments that Aids was “a bisexual disease”, adding: “I said there were a lot of bisexuals who went to these (third world) countries and had sex and then took it back to their wives or lovers and gave them the virus. That’s what I’ve read and that’s what I believe.”

The pantomime veteran, 67, said he will continue with a pre-planned trip in October to the Polish city of Krakow and visit the nearby concentration camp, where more than one million people, predominantly Jews, were killed by the Nazis.