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(from left) Phil Lyons, CEO of the National Holocaust Centre and Museum; the Chief Rabbi; James Smith, President of the Centre; Martin Stern, Holocaust survivor; philanthropist Trevor Pears

Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis has given his blessing to plans by the National Holocaust Centre and Museum in Nottinghamshire to capture the testimony of survivors for future generations.

On Sunday’s visit to the centre – after which he said he was “deeply impressed” – the chief rabbi took part in ‘The Journey,’ an interactive exhibition specifically designed for primary school children, and one of only three worldwide.

He also toured the memorial gardens where victims and survivors of the Holocaust are remembered, but it was the organisation’s plans to make sure the Holocaust and its survivors’ stories are never lost or forgotten that most interested Mirvis.

“I was fascinated to hear about the Centre’s plans to preserve and maintain the testimony of survivors in order to guarantee that future generations will have personal Holocaust testimony to reflect on and the opportunity to have their questions answered,” he said.

The Nottinghamshire centre, built around an old farmhouse in the village of Laxton, welcomes 20,000 youngsters every year. Visitors see and hear a survivor tell their story, and kids get to ask questions about the survivors’ experience.